Amazon’s Clashes With Labor: Days of Conflict and Control

[ad_1]

In recent weeks, a heated discussion about whether Amazon’s workers must urinate in bottles because they have no time to go to the bathroom — a level of control that few modern corporations would dare exercise — has raged on Twitter.

“Amazon is reorganizing the very nature of retail work — something that traditionally is physically undemanding and has a large amount of downtime — into something more akin to a factory, which never lets up,” said Spencer Cox, a former Amazon worker who is writing his Ph.D. thesis at the University of Minnesota about how the company is transforming labor. “For Amazon, this isn’t about money. This is about control of workers’ bodies and every possible moment of their time.”

Amazon did not have a comment for this article.

Signs that Amazon is facing more pushback against its control have started to pile up. In February, Lovenia Scott, a former warehouse worker for the company in Vacaville, Calif., accused Amazon in a lawsuit of having such an “immense volume of work to be completed” that she and her colleagues did not get any breaks. Ms. Scott is seeking class-action status.

Last month, the California Labor Commissioner said 718 delivery drivers who worked for Green Messengers, a Southern California contractor for Amazon, were owed $5 million in wages that never made it to their wallets. The drivers were paid for 10-hour days, the labor commissioner said, but the volume of packages was so great that they often had to work 11 or more hours and through breaks.

Amazon said it no longer worked with Green Messengers and would appeal the decision. Green Messengers could not be reached for comment.

An Amazon warehouse in the Canadian province of Ontario showed rapid spread of Covid-19 in March. “Our investigation determined a closure was required to break the chain of transmission,” said Dr. Lawrence Loh, the regional medical officer. “We provided our recommendation to Amazon.” The company, he said, “did not answer.” The health officials ordered the workers to self-isolate, effectively shutting the facility for two weeks.

And five U.S. senators wrote a letter to the company last month demanding more information about why it was equipping its delivery vans with surveillance cameras that constantly monitor the driver. The technology, the senators wrote, “raises important privacy and worker oversight questions Amazon must answer.”

[ad_2]

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Battlefield 2042 Specialists & launch maps revealed By EA
Latest News

Battlefield 2042 Specialists & launch maps revealed By EA

After months of speculation, EA and DICE have finally unveiled Battlefield 2042, with the reveal trailer already live and a gameplay one set to premiere on Sunday, during Microsoft’s E3 conference. There may be additional information released at that point but for now we already know quite a bit about the new maps and the Specialists, 2042’s version of the […]

Read More
UK Travel Green List & Rules for entering
Latest News

UK Travel Green List & Rules for entering

Red list countries and territories What you must do if you have been in a country or territory on the red list in the 10 days before you arrive in England. If you have been in a country or territory on the red list in the last 10 days you will only be allowed to […]

Read More
Latest News

Belarus to face Slovakia in 2021 IIHF World Championship opener

Belarus will open the 2021 IIHF World Championship against Slovakia in Riga on 21 May, BelTA has learned. The Group B match will be played at the Olympic Sport Center. The faceoff is at 20.10. Belarus 5 TV channel will broadcast the match live. Ahead of the IIHF World Championship Belarus played a number of […]

Read More